WWP Advanced Seminars on Scholarly Text Encoding

In 2008, the WWP received a grant from the NEH Institutes in Advanced Topics in Digital Humanities to support a series of advanced seminars on special topics in scholarly text encoding, building on our two-year introductory seminar series. This program supported seven seminars between July 2009 and June 2011.

This advanced seminar series focused on two topics:

  • Manuscript encoding: These workshops focused on the detailed challenges of encoding manuscript materials, including editorial, transcriptional, and interpretive issues and the methods of representing these in TEI markup.
  • Contextual information: These workshops focused on TEI methods for formalizing and representing information about context: named entities such as people and places, thematic analysis and keywords, text classification, glossaries and annotations.

Travel funding is available of up to $500 per participant.

The seminar schedule was as follows:

University of California, Santa Barbara
September 14-16, 2009
Hosted by the English Broadside Ballad Archive and the Transliteracies Project
This workshop focused on the encoding of contextual information.

University of Maryland, College Park
January 20-22, 2010
Hosted by the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities
This workshop focused on the encoding of manuscript materials.

Brown University
April 8-10, 2010
Hosted by the Center for Digital Scholarship
This workshop focused on the encoding of contextual information.

University at Buffalo
October 4-6, 2010
Hosted by the Digital Humanities Initiative at Buffalo
This workshop focused on the encoding of manuscript materials.

University of Nebraska-Lincoln
October 20–22, 2010
Hosted by the Center for Digital Research in the Humanities
This workshop focused on the encoding of manuscript materials.

University of Maryland
January 17-19, 2011
Hosted by the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities
This workshop focused on the encoding of contextual information.

Brown University
April 28-30, 2011
Hosted by the Center for Digital Scholarship
This workshop focused on the encoding of contextual information.